Improving The Patient Experience And Outcomes With Aesthetic Injectables: A New Strategy

AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SEEKS TO IMPROVE INJECTOR Proficiency.

HERE’S WHAT AN EXPERT SAYS ABOUT INJECTABLE SAFETY:

 

What are the main risks associated with cosmetic injectables? Which are inherent to the products and which are technique dependent?

Dr. Yoelin: The big risk with any dermal filler, regardless of composition, is the possibility of intravascular injection. However, most instances of intravascular injection, which may be common, are most likely inconsequential due to collateral circulation within the face.

When intravascular injection does occur, many variables impact the outcome. These variables include, but are not limited to, speed of injection, amount of material injected, type of material used, size of the vascular structure in question, and the region of the face in question.

Many practitioners feel that, when injecting dermal fillers in a bolus-type fashion, the injector should aspirate prior to injecting in order to develop a better idea as to whether or not the needle tip may have inadvertently penetrated a vascular structure. However, aspiration is not a surefire way to ensure that the needle tip is not in a vascular structure because of the possibility that no “flash” is visible in the barrel of the dermal filler syringe even when the needle is, in fact, in a blood vessel.

The hyaluronic acid class of dermal fillers—the largest such class in the US in terms of market share—has the advantage of reversibility because the enzyme hyaluronidase reverses the effect of hyaluronic acid.

A comprehensive understanding of 3D facial anatomy will improve patient outcomes and risk profiles. In order for practitioners to improve their understanding of facial anatomy, a variety of educational options are available. For example, company-sponsored on-label programs and continuing medical education (CME) programs represent insightful educational options. Additionally, a variety of companies are developing alternative educational approaches. For example, TruInject, a biotechnology startup based in Orange County, California, is developing an interactive training device to provide practitioners with simulated injecting experience.

Are residencies and fellowships preparing core specialists to be safe injectors?

Since injectables is still a relative young and growing field, residencies and fellowships vary to some degree in the level of comprehensiveness of their injectables instruction. As the specialty continues to grow, I suspect that residencies and fellowships will continue to develop their injectables instruction.

There is increasing focus on cannulas as potentially safer than needles, but are practitioners adopting them?

Cannulas are becoming more popular since their introduction in the US. Many practitioners feel that this form of injecting dermal fillers is safer than needles. Cannulas’ adoption by physicians is hampered by their relatively high learning curve. I recommend that practitioners interested in using cannulas first study their effective and safe use in a classroom format or from another practitioner.

How might TruInject change the injectables training landscape?

Most current educational programs focus on either learning via demonstration from an experienced practitioner or via direct practice on a live model with feedback from an experienced practitioner.

In contrast, TruInject is one of the first companies to pioneer an approach in which practitioners practice on a virtual model.

 

(originally published December 2014)

TruInject Founder Gabrielle Rios Receives Nomination for Innovator of the Year

TruInject™ is pleased to announce the nomination of Innovator of the Year by the Orange County Business Journal.

Irvine, CA, August 09, 2016 --(PR.com)-- The Orange County Business Journal (OCBJ) has nominated Gabrielle Rios, founder of TruInject, for Innovator of the Year. The Orange County Business Journal's Innovator of the Year Awards honor, recognize and celebrate individuals and their organizations who are creating game-changing products and services, and demonstrate brilliance and leadership in innovation. Since founding the company 2013, Rios has focused on innovation by developing 'The TruInject Platform' which consists of an anatomical face model, a smart syringe and a comprehensive analytical software application with built-in 3D facial anatomy. "We are honored to receive the nomination along with so many innovative and diverse companies in our category. Our team at TruInject is made up of innovators who are working on next generation technologies our customers aren't even dreaming about yet. This nomination is really about them and what they contribute to our team every single day," Founder and CEO, Gabrielle Rios.

TruInject was founded to help healthcare professionals improve patient safety by creating the first injectable simulation system featuring 3D facial anatomy in the area of facial aesthetics. Last year, the FDA issued a warning concerning complications with cosmetic fillers about the possibility of rare, but serious, injuries that may occur due to unintentional injection of soft tissue fuller into blood vessels in the face. These occurrences could block the vessels and restrict blood supply to tissues, potentially causing problems such as vision impairment, blindness and stroke. "This device may help to single handedly prevent blindness in cases of ophthalmic artery occlusion," according to Dr. Sharon Stokes, Dermatologist. "It is critical that every healthcare provider that uses dermal fillers has a clear understanding of the anatomical features of the proposed treatment area in order to reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes," according to Dr. Steve Yoelin, Ophthalmologist and national trainer for injectables. "The TruInject platform will be the first and only device of its kind that has the unique ability to 'adapt' to new products, new procedures and new injection techniques. This device will help to ensure that adverse events will be minimized." The company is currently testing Microsoft's HoloLens augmented reality technology after being given early access by Microsoft.

The Awards will be held at Hotel Irvine on September 22, 2016.

8 Latino business founders on finding their first millions

Latino-founded businesses are booming, yet less than 2 percent of Latino entrepreneurs ever make it past the $1 million revenue mark, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Of the 1.4 million Latino-owned companies in the United States, the average has $156,000 in annual sales, revealed a study from the Latin Business Action Network (LBAN).

That's what makes the following group of Latino founders the ones to watch.

The Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, a collaboration between Stanford University and LBAN, identified eight Latino founders generating well over $1 million in annual revenue or who have received at least $1 million in funding. All completed a Latino entrepreneurship program at Stanford as well.

Between 2007 and 2012, 86 percent of the growth in all small businesses could be attributed to Latino-owned businesses. Imagine what Latinos can do for business formation and job creation as more reach the success level of the eight founders on this list, provided exclusively to CNBC.

Gabrielle Rios, founder and CEO, TRUINJECT CORP

Rios is a competitor: She is a former NCAA tennis champion, All-American and national "Rookie of the Year" on the women's tennis circuit in 1998. At pharmaceutical giants — including Allergan, maker of wrinkle-eraser Botox — Rios' competitive streak led to growing her sales territories to multimillion-dollar levels. But it was the Affordable Care Act that opened her eyes to a big opportunity.

She said that under Obamacare, general physicians started supplementing their incomes with cosmetic injections, and she saw some frightening things: patient after patient at risk of serious complications during injection procedures, even blindness. "I started asking why physicians were not trained in injections," Rios said. "Many ended up training on cash-paying patients who didn't realize they were guinea pigs."

"I sat my family down and said, 'Here's the deal. I'm seeing people get hurt. I'm going to sell my house, cash in my 401(k), and find a solution.'" I thought my mom would say I'm crazy. But she said, 'You've got to do it.'"

It hasn't been easy. Being a Latina has made fundraising "super difficult," Rios said. "You see a company like mine in discussions with top pharmaceuticals and you would think with all the metrics, you'd have funding really quickly, but as a Latina, I have to hit more hurdles than others."

TruInject, the first company to focus on an injection-training software for doctors, is first going after the Botox market but already has patents that cover any part of the body.

Age: 42
Birthplace: El Paso, Texas
Education: California Polytechnic University
Company description: Irvine, California-based TruInject created the first injection simulation system for doctors in the cosmetic surgery field, with an initial focus on facial aesthetics.
Founded: 2013
Financials: Raised $2.7 million in funding

— By Claudine Hutton, special to CNBC.com
Posted 21 April 2016

http://www.cnbc.com/2016/04/21/8-latino-business-founders-on-finding-their-first-millions.html

Truinject Platform to Provide Real-Time Feedback for Cosmetic Injectors

Irvine, CA, June 05, 2015 --(PR.com)-- Truinject Corp.™ is pleased to announce the development of the TruInject Platform, the first injectable simulation system featuring true-to-life tissue, 3D digital facial anatomy and real-time feedback.

“TruInject was founded to help healthcare professionals improve patient safety by creating the first certified injection platform in the area of facial aesthetics — bringing a higher level of integrity to individual physicians and practices. Our corporate mission and partnerships align with people who share our values and commitment to patient safety,” Founder and CEO, Gabrielle Rios.

Last week, the FDA issued a warning concerning complications with cosmetic fillers about the possibility of rare, but serious, injuries that may occur due to unintentional injection of soft tissue filler into blood vessels in the face. These occurrences could block the vessels and restrict blood supply to tissues, potentially causing problems such as vision impairment, blindness and stroke.

“It is critical that every healthcare provider that uses dermal fillers has a clear understanding of the anatomical features of the proposed treatment area in order to reduce the incidence of adverse outcomes,” according to Dr. Steve Yoelin, Ophthalmologist and national trainer for injectables. “The TruInject Platform will be the first and only device of its kind that has the unique ability to 'adapt' to new products, new procedures and new injection techniques. This device will help to ensure that adverse events will be minimized.”

The TruInject Platform consists of an anatomical face model, a smart syringe, and a comprehensive analytical software application with built-in 3D facial anatomy. This comprehensive platform facilitates continuous practice at all skill levels. TruInject is the only injector training platform designed to teach the accurate use of injectables, allowing physicians to become experts while enhancing patient safety and outcomes.

“The TruInject Platform offers the most advanced technology for teaching and understanding facial anatomy. I personally am passionate about teaching anatomy and the importance this platform will make regarding patient safety with injectables,” said Dr. Susan Weinkle, Dermatologist and Past-President of the American Society of Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS).

Gabrielle Rios, wins Stevie Award for Startup of the Year

From DermWire
Personnel/Company News PracticalDermatology.com

Gabrielle Rios, chief executive officer of TruInject Corporation, received the Bronze Award at the 2014 Stevie Awards for Women in Business. The award was presented in the category of Startup of the Year.
The Stevie® Awards for Women in Business honors women executives, entrepreneurs, and organizations run by women. Results of the 2014 competition were announced Friday, November 14 at a gala dinner at the Marriott Marquis Hotel in New York City.
The Stevie Awards for Women in Business is an international competition produced by the creators of the prestigious International Business Awards and American Business Awards.
More than 1,200 nominations from organizations and individuals in 22 nations were submitted to the awards this year for consideration in categories including Entrepreneur of the Year, Executive of the Year, Most Innovative Company of the Year, and Best New Company of the Year, among others. More than 160 professionals around the world participated in the judging process to determine the Finalists and then the Gold, Silver and Bronze Stevie Award placements.

http://modernaesthetics.com/wire/view.asp?20141119-gabrielle_rios_founder_of_truinject_wins_stevie_award_for_startups

TRUINJECT receives US patent approval

Truinject Corp. announced that the U.S. Patent Office has approved a patent for the company’s cosmetic and therapeutic injector training system, according to a press release.

The system will be tested among select doctors during the next several months, the release said.

“This is an incredibly detailed system using a true-to-life head model and a smart syringe,” Gabrielle Rios, TruInject founder and CEO, said in the press release. “Our goal is to create a comprehensive certified training system that accelerates the learning process for injectors of aesthetic fillers and toxins, increasing doctor skill and confidence in administering the procedures and helping assure patient safety.”

The system includes computer visuals that allow the trainee to peel back the model head layers to fully understand the injection procedure in relation to the needle, skin, muscle, nerves and bone layers it affects.

Whereas traditional training methods typically involve a great deal of time before doctors gain skill and confidence in their technique, the TruInject system is designed to help accelerate the learning period, according to the press release.